Sobriety is wonderful. Books are wonderful. So it stands to reason that sobriety books are uber-wonderful!

 

Earlier this week, we published Volume III of my Kindle series, Think Right Into Limitless Sobriety, which is available for FREE on Amazon through Saturday. You can get your copy by clicking here.

Today, we are also re-posting a list of memoirs by sober women curated from the blog at Anaheim Lighthouse.  You may read the original post here.

In gratitude, harmony, and support,

 

 

The Top Six Female Recovery Memoirs

It’s tough being a female addict. Heavy drinking is often viewed more negatively in women than in men, women tend to progress faster in their addictions than men do, and we don’t recover at the same rate. In fact, a study completed in Germany shows that alcoholism is twice as fatal for women than men.

Fortunately, we have many success stories to learn from.

Here is an overview of six of them:

1. In My Skin, by Kate Holden

What’s a nice girl like you doing in a place like this? Shy and book smart, Kate comes from a middle-class background, someone whom you would not see as having many risk factors for addiction. Nevertheless, she was uncertain about her future, and found herself experimenting with drugs. A one-time experiment with friends quickly morphed into a full blown addiction.

Her memoir chronicles a hazardous period of loss and danger followed by a discovery of strength she never knew she had. It is a story of hope that will touch your heart and inspire you to remain sober.

 

2. The Big Fix, by Tracy Helton Mitchell

Written by a female addict for the female addict, this book chronicles the many gender-based issues women have to face when getting sober. She also addresses the failings of the current rehab system in place today.

A single mother of three children, she reveals all in her journey to sobriety and rekindling important relationships, ultimately building a much better life for herself and her family.

 

3. Girl Walks Out of a Bar, by Lisa F. Smith

This author takes a different approach, focusing on the arduous journey of what is sometimes referred to as a “functional alcoholic”. Her addiction develops as a result of the pressures of being a young adult struggling to make her way in the corporate world.

While remaining in control, she still made many devastating decisions. Once she realizes that she is simply functioning, but not living, she takes the reader on a journey of how she maintains her sobriety and avoids relapse.

 

4. Blackout, by Sarah Hepola

This author focuses on some of the underlying issues leading many women to substance abuse rather than taking on the work of re-establishing their self-esteem. Weary of having to apologize for actions she didn’t even remember, Sarah documents her re-discovery of her identity and developing confidence to face the world as a sober person.

Her raw portrayal of her journey to sobriety is a source of inspiration for female addicts everywhere.

 

5. Turnabout, Jean Kirkpatrick

Although published 40 years ago, Ms. Kirkpatrick’s journey to sobriety is still relevant today. It covers another important difference of the physical effects of alcoholism in women versus men. In her case, she developed cirrhosis of the liver around the same time she achieved permanent sobriety, an added challenge to be sure.

She also created her own recovery program after feeling that traditional 12-step programs failed her, which is something many of us can relate to.

 

6. Smashed, by Koren Zailckas

This memoir reveals the journey of the teenage, female alcoholic and the world of binge drinking that leads to blackouts, alcohol poisoning, and eventual victimization. She readily acknowledges that addiction is a disease while identifying the dangerous increase of the popular binge drinking trend that often propels young women into their addictions.

Her sobriety is supported by a system of documenting triggers and placing them out of her mind and into a file box.

Each one of these memoirs offers us something different to learn from, in turn, making us less susceptible to the dangers of relapse.

 

 

Sobriety Books

One thought on “Sobriety Books

  • October 16, 2017 at 8:31 pm
    Permalink

    Can’t wait to read each and every one of these.

    Reply

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