Recovery Consciousness: Incorporating Buddhist Ideals

Recovery Consciousness: Incorporating Buddhist Ideals

You may know the 12 steps through AA or NA . These steps can be applied to any organization or group. Most religions have taken the 12 steps and given them a spin, incorporating their ideals. This makes for a creative and personalized way to relate and integrate into your life. Below are the 12 steps adapted to fit Buddhism. Perhaps you may find some connection to this version of the well-known steps.

12 Words that Redefine Sobriety

12 Words that Redefine Sobriety

There are times when the question “What do you mean you don’t drink? Why not??” comes up. Recognizing that not everyone gets it, and I really don’t feel the need to explain anymore, I still sometimes want to say, “No, really it’s OK, in fact it’s better than OK – being a sober alcoholic in recovery is magical, it’s beyond my wildest dreams.” I looked up the definition of “sobriety.” No wonder people are distressed for me. Words like: somberness; solemnity; seriousness; sedateness; staidness; subdued; grave demeanor were there.

An Extraordinary Life in Sobriety

An Extraordinary Life in Sobriety

At New Thought Sobriety, we are great fans of Tommy Rosen––author, yoga teacher, and founder of Recovery 2.0! Tommy was interviewed this week on The SHAIR Podcast, and we are excited to re-post that episode for our followers. How can a person can get from a rock bottom life in addiction to an extraordinary life in sobriety? Just listen to Tommy Rosen’s story of true transformation.

Overcoming Complacency

Overcoming Complacency

In order to avoid one of the biggest threats in long term sobriety you are going to have to use a proactive approach to your recovery. This has to happen on a day-to-day basis, even after having been clean and sober for years or decades. The threat is complacency: You tend to get lazy as you rack up more and more clean time and you get more and more comfortable living the sober life. Suddenly you no longer have to push yourself nearly as hard as you once did in order to maintain sobriety. Living sober becomes familiar, easy, more automatic.

Anger – A Tool Not a Lifestyle

Anger – A Tool Not a Lifestyle

Did anger ever used to sneak up and overtake you? Does it still sometimes? Learning to feel the full range of emotions means also learning what to do with them once felt… Fear, rage, and shame. These were the dominant emotions in my home growing up. Healthy modeling of how to express anger I do not recall. Anger was at times downplayed or denied; other times fire-breathing and frightening. So I am still fine tuning my anger-expressing skills. Actually even identifying and feeling anger. For me the learning experience is (a) how not to repress it– and (b) then what?

Recovery Consciousness: Building Healthy Habits

Recovery Consciousness: Building Healthy Habits

The goal of recovery isn’t simply “clean and sober” living—although that’s a very important component—but also creating a stable, strong foundation on which to rebuild your life. It takes most people between two and six months—66 days is average—to form a new habit. Fortunately most experts agree that creating new, healthy habits isn’t an “all or nothing” proposition. If you’re in recovery and seeking to adopt and incorporate healthy habits to help you maintain your sobriety, we’ve got some great ideas for you.

Sober People Doing Amazing Things

Sober People Doing Amazing Things

Our guest post this week is curated from the blog at Nerdy Sober Hipsters. Author David begins, “The world is full of sober people, doing amazing things! Today our spotlight is on Phil Cho, a Korean-American urban and landscape photographer based in LA/Orange County. His work focuses on capturing the stark grandeur of skyscrapers, man-made backdrops, and ocean views. In our interview, we get to chat with Phil about life, art, sobriety, and the feeling he gets from climbing to the top of a skyscraper.”

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