Recovery Consciousness: Do You Want the Good Stuff?

Recovery Consciousness: Do You Want the Good Stuff?

Every single day that I am sober is proof of a miracle and reminds me that there is something much larger than myself out there. Because I did not do this. My thinking got me in much worse places than the rooms of Alcoholic’s Anonymous… I cannot deny that there is a power greater than myself, for I am sober, period. When I live a spiritual life, I feel more connected to all of life––to myself, to the people I surround myself with, to each moment. I feel more full. I am able to notice things I have never noticed before…

Being a Mom in Recovery

Being a Mom in Recovery

I’m a sober mom. I don’t drink alcohol. Ever. I went through my sh*t, dug myself out, and am now a mom in recovery. It’s been the most challenging work of my life, but I’ve gotten to a point where I’m so grateful for everything I’ve been through. I appreciate the little things in life more than I ever have before, and I have emerged as the best version of myself. Still, being in recovery can feel lonely at times. And being a mom in recovery? Maybe even more so. Here is what I want you to know about my life as a sober mom.

My Father’s Daughter

My Father’s Daughter

Father’s Day card shopping was always stressful. I’d go through dozens of cards. Nothing fit. All I wanted was one that said Happy Father’s Day, period. But those were scarce. Mostly they dripped with sugary sweet sentiments like “Dad, you are the beacon of our family,” “You always had time for me and showed me how things were done,” or “You taught me right from wrong.” And the clincher: “I hope when I grow up, I’ll be just like you.” That was the last thing I wanted. But, ironically, that’s exactly what happened.

Alcoholic: What’s in a Word?

Alcoholic: What’s in a Word?

Medical, legal and cultural language evolves. In healthcare, person-first is replacing problem-first language. This isn’t hyper-liberalism; studies verify that person-first language promotes dignity and diminishes stigma. “Disabled people” or “the disabled” is problem-first language. Societal norms dictate“persons with disability” is less stigmatizing. We call ourselves alcoholics in AA. Outside our meeting doors, caregivers address us as “persons with alcoholism” or“persons with alcohol use-disorder.”

ODAAT

ODAAT

Circumstances can derail us temporarily, even though it doesn’t feel temporary to me when I’m in that space. All the pithy phrases that roll through my mind can ring hollow and sound trite when my pendulum is swinging the other way––quite unlike their tone when I’m feeling confident, on top of the world, and in the flow. But even in my sometimes sarcastic mind, I do know the principles are pure and true. They stand strong when I feel weak. They will be there waiting for me when I am ready to let their truths back in.

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