Sobriety: How Do You Do It?

Sobriety: How Do You Do It?

A lot of adults in many cultures in this world have not gone for any extended period of time without alcohol since their teenage years and for many this is a happy crutch, able to control with ease and drink for pleasure. For others who are heavy drinkers or binge drinkers, unhealthy amounts are consumed in short periods of time but stopped to resume daily life and business until the next drinking session begins. There are alcoholics who have no off button when it comes to drinking and often end up in complete oblivion or black out on a regular basis, people that have lost control over their drinking. Unless, like me, who has complete abstinence from alcohol, chances are every person falls into one of those categories.

Sobriety and Self-improvement

Sobriety and Self-improvement

As you may know, the “idea” of New Thought Sobriety was inspired by the beautiful blending of two teachings: Metaphysical spirituality and twelve-step recovery. If you are an adherent of both, you know what a gift this fusion is. We spoke to someone recently who couldn’t quite see the compatibility between the two. His rationale went something like this: 1. Many people come to New Thought on the road to self-improvement. 2. Many people come to AA out of desperation or by court order. 3. These are two completely different mindsets. Would it have sounded judgmental to say his claim was a gross generalization? It probably would have, so we didn’t come right out and say it. Instead, we went looking for other people’s opinions on the matter because, well, we do love us some research!

Atheists and Agnostics in Recovery

Atheists and Agnostics in Recovery

Perhaps one of the greatest challenges people face when committing to a 12-step program is the “God part.” It is often the case that we feel let down or forgotten by God, or that God has somehow favored others over us. The freedom to define a Higher Power for ourselves is liberating. As we are encouraged to align with a God of our understanding, we begin to see the light in a very real way. But what about atheists and agnostics? There are those who are perfectly comfortable not believing in God or questioning the existence of “a Power greater than ourselves.” And yes, they get sober, too…

Self-confidence and Asking for Help

Self-confidence and Asking for Help

Sometimes you forget just how important it is to have confidence in yourself until the moment you need it most. For many battling addiction, years of substance abuse has eroded all traces of self-assurance and makes recovery seem like an impossible goal. There comes a moment where the next step is either the sober path or deeper addiction — and you have to feel certain about your choice. We recently spoke to a few people in addiction recovery who explained that confidence isn’t just helpful in the process, but necessary. Here are a few of the insights they shared with us.

Set Me Free from Bad Choices

Set Me Free from Bad Choices

The title of today’s post is a lyric from the song “I’m on Fire” by Chuck Negron. Chuck is a former member of the band, Three Dog Night, and he recently released a video for the song. “I’m on Fire” is a beautiful tune that communicates Chuck’s struggle with addiction and his journey to spirituality and 25 years of sobriety. If you love this song––and the video––like we do , be sure to visit Chuck Negron’s YouTube channel.

Have Sobriety, Will Travel!

Have Sobriety, Will Travel!

Lately I’ve noticed attendance is kind of low at my regular meetings. It’s summer, and people are vacationing, and I find myself wondering, are my sober sisters and brothers attending meetings wherever they are? I don’t mean this in an inventory-taking kind of way; rather, I am genuinely interested. I love finding meetings when I travel to other cities––or even countries. Today’s guest post talks about attending AA meetings no matter where you are.

Recovery, Spirituality, and Humility

Recovery, Spirituality, and Humility

Most people would agree that spirituality is the foundation of recovery. Even those who initially struggle with the idea of a Higher Power usually discover a spiritual hunger within themselves. Fortunately, twelve-step programs urge us to find our own definition of God. I believe the primary reason New Thought harmonizes with Alcoholic Anonymous so beautifully is that neither approach attempts to tell us what to think; rather, each offers an effective model for how to think. For those of us who adhere to both philosophies, this is a match made in heaven.

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