Religion and Spirituality

Religion and Spirituality

The issue of religion arises at least once a month at any 12-step meeting that includes newcomers. It’s amazing how it causes confusion. Some folks claim that you have to believe in God, while others say all you have to do is admit you aren’t Him.  Others, myself among them, maintain that the spirituality aspect of the program has nothing to do with God unless we choose to make it so.  Only one thing’s for sure: put two addicts in the same room and it will soon be overflowing with opinions.

Sharing the Faith

Sharing the Faith

Sometimes I wish I could loan my faith to others.  At least I felt that way the other night at my homegroup when the topic was “your spiritual experience.”  In share after share, people balanced guarded reservation with the undeniable fact that, once they sincerely asked a higher power for help, their addiction was lifted and a new way of living began for them.  A few also shared that certain inexplicable synchronicities or phenomena had strengthened their faith.

Emotional Sobriety

Emotional Sobriety

What is emotional sobriety? Some might think that it means being “happy, joyous, and free,” a common adage in 12-Step meetings, taken from AA literature. Of course, people like this definition. It means that if they work a good program, they will achieve physical sobriety (abstinence) and become happy in the process.

GOD: Good Orderly Direction

GOD: Good Orderly Direction

In my own early recovery, I had issues with God and was afraid for my chances of long-term recovery. Thankfully, those who have achieved long-term sobriety can and often will help addicts, and one told me that GOD can stand for Good Orderly Direction. This simple shift in thought helped in my personal journey of spiritual surrender, and I developed a deeper relationship with God as a result.

Saving a Seat (and Knowing the Truth)

Saving a Seat (and Knowing the Truth)

Old playgrounds, old playmates. Early in my sobriety, I grappled with the idea that I would have to give up the places and people I loved––the latter being the greater sacrifice, naturally.

It was easier than I imagined to avoid my old haunts, and most of my friends were happy to meet for coffee instead of drinks or to take a walk after dinner instead of staying out ’til the wee hours.