Embracing a New Way

Embracing a New Way

Today I want to talk about the first step.

They say in meetings that it is the only one that needs to be done perfectly. And yet it seems to be the most difficult one. And not just for New Thought folks but for everyone. If you are a New Thought person, then you know what the objection is. That one word: powerless. We are taught in New Thought that we are most definitely not powerless. Others object because they simply don’t want to stop the old way of living, and still others object because they are too afraid of the unknown to let go of the known.

Don’t Put Off Till Tomorrow . . .

Don’t Put Off Till Tomorrow . . .

Procrastination: one word with such a powerful meaning behind it. We all do it. I will admit I am often guilty of putting things off.

I was in a therapy coaching session of my own a couple years ago sifting through pieces of my recovery story trying to uncover why I seem to procrastinate sometimes on important things – like my writing. Ironically, I’ve procrastinated down to the wire on this very blog post even after being mindful of what I learned in that session with my coach.

Conscious Contact – Imperfectly

Conscious Contact – Imperfectly

I really struggle with how to best illustrate Step Eleven.

I struggle with it because I have a preconceived notion of what conscious contact with God is supposed to look like.

And it looks all Instagram-y.

You know ….

I wake up refreshed in the morning hungry for the Word of God. The very first thing I do is make a picture-perfect cup of coffee in the Keurig (for extra effect the coffee cup should be emblazoned with the words “Hope” or “Faith” or “Love” and – in finer print – a scriptural reference.) Taking my place on the sofa, I pray for God to expand my understanding during this special time with him as the kitty cats snuggle in next to me.

Religion as an Addiction [Book Review]

Religion as an Addiction [Book Review]

Elizabeth Esther grew up in a fundamentalist Christian cult. Her upbringing left her not only with deep spiritual wounds but with an unhealthy addiction to the highs of religious experience. In her new book Spiritual Sobriety, which comes out April 19th, she talks through strategies for recovering from spiritual addiction, making us of the wisdom from 12 step programs. It’s a new way of thinking about recovery from fundamentalism that I haven’t encountered before, and I really think she’s onto something.

Success in Recovery

Success in Recovery

For those who are beginning their journey of recovery, that path is filled with uncertainty, doubt and even hesitance. Of all the obstacles that can be faced in recovery, the concept of spirituality is the one that can trip people up the most. Whether it is in drug treatment or around the tables of 12-step meetings, the concept of developing spirituality in recovery is all pervasive–and many will struggle in understanding how spirituality will help them achieve and maintain their recovery.

To Label or Not to Label

To Label or Not to Label

I am a licensed practitioner with Centers for Spiritual Living, and I am a recovering alcoholic.  I wanted to write this article because there appears to be ongoing controversy about people in New Thought  saying “I am an alcoholic.”

I have heard ministers, practitioners, and laity express concern that I “put that label” on myself. When I invite further conversation around the subject,  I am told that if I really understood and believed our teachings,  I would know that the label adds power to “the problem.” Some people have even gone so far as to say I should not be attaching such a negative word to myself–one that adds power to the condition–because I am claiming ownership of the condition when I do that.

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