Being a Mom in Recovery

Being a Mom in Recovery

I’m a sober mom. I don’t drink alcohol. Ever. I went through my sh*t, dug myself out, and am now a mom in recovery. It’s been the most challenging work of my life, but I’ve gotten to a point where I’m so grateful for everything I’ve been through. I appreciate the little things in life more than I ever have before, and I have emerged as the best version of myself. Still, being in recovery can feel lonely at times. And being a mom in recovery? Maybe even more so. Here is what I want you to know about my life as a sober mom.

Alcoholic: What’s in a Word?

Alcoholic: What’s in a Word?

Medical, legal and cultural language evolves. In healthcare, person-first is replacing problem-first language. This isn’t hyper-liberalism; studies verify that person-first language promotes dignity and diminishes stigma. “Disabled people” or “the disabled” is problem-first language. Societal norms dictate“persons with disability” is less stigmatizing. We call ourselves alcoholics in AA. Outside our meeting doors, caregivers address us as “persons with alcoholism” or“persons with alcohol use-disorder.”

Recovery Consciousness: Incorporating Buddhist Ideals

Recovery Consciousness: Incorporating Buddhist Ideals

You may know the 12 steps through AA or NA . These steps can be applied to any organization or group. Most religions have taken the 12 steps and given them a spin, incorporating their ideals. This makes for a creative and personalized way to relate and integrate into your life. Below are the 12 steps adapted to fit Buddhism. Perhaps you may find some connection to this version of the well-known steps.

An Extraordinary Life in Sobriety

An Extraordinary Life in Sobriety

At New Thought Sobriety, we are great fans of Tommy Rosen––author, yoga teacher, and founder of Recovery 2.0! Tommy was interviewed this week on The SHAIR Podcast, and we are excited to re-post that episode for our followers. How can a person can get from a rock bottom life in addiction to an extraordinary life in sobriety? Just listen to Tommy Rosen’s story of true transformation.

Overcoming Complacency

Overcoming Complacency

In order to avoid one of the biggest threats in long term sobriety you are going to have to use a proactive approach to your recovery. This has to happen on a day-to-day basis, even after having been clean and sober for years or decades. The threat is complacency: You tend to get lazy as you rack up more and more clean time and you get more and more comfortable living the sober life. Suddenly you no longer have to push yourself nearly as hard as you once did in order to maintain sobriety. Living sober becomes familiar, easy, more automatic.

Recovery Consciousness: Building Healthy Habits

Recovery Consciousness: Building Healthy Habits

The goal of recovery isn’t simply “clean and sober” living—although that’s a very important component—but also creating a stable, strong foundation on which to rebuild your life. It takes most people between two and six months—66 days is average—to form a new habit. Fortunately most experts agree that creating new, healthy habits isn’t an “all or nothing” proposition. If you’re in recovery and seeking to adopt and incorporate healthy habits to help you maintain your sobriety, we’ve got some great ideas for you.

Sober People Doing Amazing Things

Sober People Doing Amazing Things

Our guest post this week is curated from the blog at Nerdy Sober Hipsters. Author David begins, “The world is full of sober people, doing amazing things! Today our spotlight is on Phil Cho, a Korean-American urban and landscape photographer based in LA/Orange County. His work focuses on capturing the stark grandeur of skyscrapers, man-made backdrops, and ocean views. In our interview, we get to chat with Phil about life, art, sobriety, and the feeling he gets from climbing to the top of a skyscraper.”

Self-Care in Recovery

Self-Care in Recovery

People who carve out time in their day to honor themselves will experience many benefits. Some individuals will feel a lowered level of anxiety. Honoring oneself can help to boost your self-esteem and self-confidence. It can help you be a better friend, in that it will increase your level of compassion and empathy. It can even help raise your immune system… If you honor yourself, and love yourself first, all of these fantastic benefits can follow.

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